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Student Services

 

The EDUPRIZE High School College and Career Center (CCC) is available to EHS students in every grade level. Students interested in exploring their post-high options can contact Mr. Atkin at jeremy.atkin@eduprizeschools.net for an appointment.

The primary goal of the CCC is to spark students’ interests and engage them in planning for life after high school. Students who visit the CCC can find the latest information about exploring colleges and universities, college and university admissions, college applications, financial aid (FAFSA/ORSAA), scholarships and grants, community service, volunteer opportunities, and much, much more!

All EHS students are encouraged to check out the vast array of resources the CCC has to offer. Students should visit the CCC early and often throughout their high school careers, as waiting until senior year to start investigating post-high options can be extremely stressful! Students can seek assistance and support in post-high exploration and planning to achieve bright futures based on their individual ambitions, goals, talents, and dreams.

About the ACT

The ACT is an entrance exam used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. It is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test administered by ACT, Inc.

The purpose of the ACT test is to measure a high school student’s readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important ACT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

When Should I Take the ACT?

Most high school students take the ACT, SAT, or both during the spring of their junior year or fall of their senior year. It’s important to leave time to re-take the test if you need to raise your score before you apply to college. The ACT exam is offered nationally every year in September, October, December, February*, April, June, and July*.  View all upcoming  ACT test dates.

What is on the ACT?

There are four ACT sections: 

  • English
  • Reading
  • Math
  • Science

The ACT also includes an optional 40-minute Writing Test. Some colleges may require that you complete the ACT Writing Test. You can confirm each college’s admissions policies on the school website or on our  school profiles.

How is the ACT scored?

Each section of the ACT is scored on a 1 to 36 point scale. Your composite ACT score is the average of your four section scores, also on a scale from 1 to 36. If you take the ACT with Writing Test, you will receive a separate score on the Writing Test.

Should I Take the ACT or SAT?

Most colleges and universities will accept scores from either the SAT or ACT, and do not favor one test over the other. That said, college-bound students are increasingly taking  both the SAT and ACT.  Changes made to the SAT in 2016 have made it easier than ever to prep for both tests concurrently—and earn competitive scores on both! The best way to decide if taking the SAT, ACT, or both tests is right for you is to take a timed  full-length practice test  of each type. Since the content and style of the SAT and ACT are very similar, factors like how you handle time pressure and what types of questions you find most challenging can help you determine which test is a better fit. Try our  QUIZ: SAT, ACT, or Both?  to learn more

About the SAT

The SAT is an entrance exam used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. The SAT is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test created and administered by the College Board.

The purpose of the SAT is to measure a high school student’s readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. College admissions officers will review standardized test scores alongside your high school GPA, the classes you took in high school, letters of recommendation from teachers or mentors, extracurricular activities, admissions interviews, and personal essays. How important SAT scores are in the college application process varies from school to school.

Overall, the higher you score on the SAT and/or ACT, the more options for attending and paying for college will be available to you.

When should I take the SAT?

Most high school students take the SAT, the ACT, or both during the spring of their junior year or fall of their senior year. It’s important to leave time to re-take the test if you need to raise your score before you apply to college. The SAT exam is offered nationally every year in August, October, November, December, March, May, and June. View all upcoming SAT test dates.

What is on the SAT?

There are two  SAT sections: 

  • Math
  • Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

The SAT also includes an optional Essay section. SAT Essay scores are reported separately from overall test scores. Some colleges may require that you complete the SAT Essay. You can confirm each college’s admissions policies on the school website or on our  school profiles.

How is the SAT scored?

Each section of the SAT is scored on a 200 to 800 point scale. Your total SAT score is the sum of your section scores. The highest possible SAT score is 1600. If you take the Essay, you will receive a separate score.

Should I Take the SAT or ACT?

Most colleges and universities will accept scores from either the SAT or ACT, and do not favor one test over the other. That said, college-bound students are increasingly taking  both the SAT and ACT. Changes made to the SAT in 2016 have made it easier than ever to prep for both tests concurrently—and earn competitive scores on both! The best way to decide if taking the SAT, ACT, or both tests is right for you is to take a timed  full-length practice test  of each type. Since the content and style of the SAT and ACT are very similar, factors like how you handle time pressure and what types of questions you find most challenging can help you determine which test is a better fit. Try our  QUIZ: SAT, ACT, or Both?  to learn more.

AzCIS for High School Students

Portfolio
• My Portfolio: Save and organize assessment results, resumes, career information, and work samples in your electronic portfolio
• Personal Learning Plan: System auto-generates plan with saved goals, reflections, and content for student led conference
• Combined Report of Assessments: Synthesize assessment results in one easy-to-read report

Planning
• Checklists: Track progress on school assignments and activities
• Career Plan: Research career and school options, set goals, and make future plans
• Course Planner: Generate and update course plans
• Application Tracker: Track your school applications, test scores, meeting dates, deadlines, and record the status of applications and transcripts

Assessments
• Career Cluster Inventory: Relate interests to matching career clusters
• IDEAS: Identify interests and match to career clusters and occupations
• Interest Profiler: Relate interests to Holland types and careers
• SKILLS: Correlate skill preferences to occupations
• Work Importance Locator: Identify work needs and correlate with work values to see matching occupations
• Learning Styles Survey: Identify personal learning style and how to enhance study skills
• Employability Skills Survey: Identify skills that need development, set improvement goals
• Assessment Link: Match the results of other assessments to CIS occupations

Exploration
• Reality Check: Find occupations that pay enough to support lifestyle preferences
• Occupation Sort: Generate a list of occupations based on work-related preferences
• School Sort: Create a list of schools based on major, cost, size, and location
• Financial Aid Sort: Create a list of scholarships based on goals, abilities, and background Occupations
• Choosing Occupations: Discover how to narrow occupation choices
• Career Clusters: Explore broad categories of occupations that are grouped by knowledge and skills required
• Occupations: Learn about occupations, wages, preparation, and outlook
• Green Jobs: Learn about environmentally-friendly occupations
• Military Occupations: View occupational requirements and military training
• Compare Occupations: View two occupations side by side
• Self-Employment: Learn which occupations have a high rate of self-employment, and the basics of running a business

Schools
• Choosing a School: Learn about different types of schools, admissions tests, admissions process, and how to select a school
• Programs of Study: Explore options for study after high school and what schools offer each program
• Compare Schools: View up to three schools side by side
• US Colleges and Universities: View detailed information about US schools Financial Aid
• Paying for School: Learn about financial aid and how to apply for it
• Financial Aid: Learn about scholarships and grants, qualifications, and how and when to apply
• National Scholarships: Learn about national scholarships and grants

Employment
• Resume Creator: Create a resume to highlight skills and abilities, and format personal information
• Job Search: Learn how to conduct a job search, prepare for interviews, and learn tips for negotiating salary and benefits
• Job Success: Learn good job habits plus tips for working well with supervisors and coworkers

What is Dual Enrollment?

Dual Enrollment is a cost-effective way for high school students to get a head start on college. It allows you to enroll in college courses while you are still in high school, saving time and money. Dual enrollment is also a proven way for determined students to pursue advanced coursework related to your anticipated major.

Benefits of Dual Enrollment

1. Earn High School and College Credit at the Same Time
  • Dual enrollment is a program that allows eligible students currently attending Maricopa County public schools and participating private and charter schools to simultaneously enroll in college courses.
  • Earned Rio Salado College credits count toward high school graduation and can be applied to a college degree or certificate.

 

2. Be College Ready
  • Dual enrollment provides quality learning opportunities by helping high school students prepare for college. The student’s high school to college transition begins early in a familiar and comfortable environment.
  • According to a recent study from the Community College Research Center at Columbia University, 88% of dual enrollment students who took community college courses in high school continued pursuing college after high school, with most achieving a degree or transfer within six years.

 

3. Save Money on Tuition
  • Dual enrollment courses are cost-effective with students getting low community college tuition rates. Qualifying students may receive tuition assistance based on financial need.
  • High schools usually pay for dual enrollment college textbooks. Dual enrollment students usually only pay tuition. Tuition for dual enrollment courses is the same at all Maricopa Community Colleges and significantly less than the typical four-year college.

 

4. Earn a College Degree in Less Time
  • Taking college classes while a student is in high school reduces the number of credits needed for a degree when the student eventually pursues college full time. Students can usually graduate or transfer earlier.

 

5. Student Success Coaching
  • Dual Enrollment has two Student Success Coaches on staff. They are available to meet with students and parents to discuss the best path towards earning an Associate’s degree, or one of many certificates (AGEC, et.al.).
  • They can meet with students as young as 8th grade going into their freshmen year of high school, so they start on the right track (depending on which high school they will be attending).  Rio Salado College’s Dual Enrollment Office is the only Dual program within the Maricopa Community College District with Success Coaches on staff.

The East Valley Institute of Technology is one of the best resources Arizona’s students have to guarantee themselves success. Upheld as a model for career and technical education by the U.S. Department of Education, EVIT provides students with the advanced skills and training needed to thrive in today’s competitive job market.

EVIT adds to a student’s academic instruction with hands-on learning provided by experienced professionals and excellent resources. By allowing students to earn elective credit in more than 40 occupation-specific programs, EVIT enhances the future of every type of student. Most programs prepare students for state or national licensing or certifications, internship opportunities and over 270 dual enrollment college credits.

EVIT programs are tuition-free to high school students who live in 11 East Valley school districts.

 

Who Should Fill Out the FAFSA?

Anyone planning on going to college in the next academic year should fill out the FAFSA.

Here’s why:

  • Each year, millions—sometimes billions—of dollars in federal aid is left on the table by students who didn’t file a FAFSA. It’s simple: If you don’t file, you won’t qualify for most financial aid.
  • Your family doesn’t have to have a low income to qualify for assistance. Even if your family makes $200,000 a year, you could be eligible for aid.
  • You automatically qualify for a low-interest federal loan when you submit a FAFSA. These loans are less expensive to pay back than many private student loans.
  • Many work-study programs require the FAFSA.
  • Some merit-based scholarships require the FAFSA to help them determine scholarship amounts.

When to Submit Your FAFSA: Understanding FAFSA Deadlines

You can file as early as October 1 for the following academic year. It’s a good idea to submit the application as soon as possible because financial aid is often given out on a first-come, first-served basis.

There are three types of FAFSA deadlines:

  • College deadlines: Important when you’re applying for aid from a college. Deadlines vary by school, so check college websites or contact the financial aid offices of the colleges you’re interested in to find out when you need to submit your FAFSA.
  • State deadlines: Important when you’re applying for aid from your state.  Check your state’s FAFSA deadline.
  • Federal deadline: June 30 is the last day you can apply for federal aid for the following academic year.

Remember: You should send in your FAFSA as soon as you can, regardless of deadlines. There’s a lot of financial aid out there—give yourself the best shot at getting the most assistance by applying early.

How to Fill Out the FAFSA?

There are three ways to complete and submit your FAFSA:

We recommend filling out the FAFSA online or through the app. Both options offer useful tips to help you understand the questions, which can make it a lot easier to fill out and submit the application.

When you fill out the FAFSA electronically, you’ll be asked to create a federal student aid ID (FSA ID). You’ll use it to sign the electronic form. Because one of your parents also has to sign off on your FAFSA, they’ll need to create an FSA ID, too.

FAFSA Facts

  • Submitting the FAFSA is the most important thing you can do if you want financial aid.
  • The FAFSA is free—you don’t need to pay anyone to prepare it for you.
  • You need to submit a new FAFSA before each academic year in which you want to get aid. If you plan to apply for aid throughout college, you’ll need to fill out the FAFSA each year.
  • Be sure to use a permanent email address on the form, not your high school email, so you can use your FAFSA account throughout college.
  • Completing the FAFSA is one of six steps you need to take to qualify for a $40,000 College Board Opportunity Scholarship.
  • You qualify for a $1,000 College Board Opportunity Scholarship just by submitting your FAFSA.

FAFSA Resources


The FAFSA Hotline
The hotline is available Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

  • English: 1 (833) AZ-FAFSA (833) 293-2372
  • Spanish: 1 (833) Mi-FAFSA (833) 643-2372


Benji, the FAFSA Chatbot
Students can text their FAFSA questions 24/7 to (602) 786-8171, AskBenji.org

Be A Leader Foundation
Be A Leader Foundation is offering virtual appointments to assist students with their FAFSA, college applications, next steps, and college enrollment. Please visit the Be A Leader Foundation website to complete the webform and schedule an appointment.

College Depot
College Depot provides personal assistance with financial aid, admissions, and all things college. Students can request a virtual appointment with a College Depot Advisor by filling out their online virtual appointment request.

 

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the form you need to fill out to get any financial aid from the federal government to help pay for college. Each year, over 13 million students who file the FAFSA get more than $120 billion in grants, work-study, and low-interest loans from the U.S. Department of Education.

Lots of states and colleges also use the FAFSA to determine which students get financial aid—and how much they’ll get.

The FAFSA asks for information about you and your family’s finances, including tax returns, so you’ll need your parents’ help to complete it.

 

Use this simple EZ Grading calculator to find quiz, test, and assignment scores.  This page redirects you to an external link not affiliated with EDUPRIZE SCHOOLS and contains ads.

 

Parchment is the most widely adopted digital credential service, allowing learners, academic institutions, and employers to request, verify, and share credentials in simple and secure ways.